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Ninja Team

The purpose of this US Ninja is to improve patient care through clinical ultrasound by sharing some local narrated lectures and blog posts from the Cook County Ultrasound Division. We do not extensively prep or post edits because we want you to feel as if you are sitting right next to us learning together. 

Many Thanks to All Our Fabulous:
- Patients
- Nurses and Support Staff
- Students
- Residents
- Visiting Fellows from across the hospital and country

Most importantly, BIG thanks to the many wonderful CUS FOAMed leaders whose efforts form the basis of our FOAMed Toolbox and whose content often fills our didactics. Huge Shouts Out to Matt Dawson, Mike Mallin, Mike Stone, Ben Smith and Jacob Avila as well as dozens of other US FOAMed pioneers in our community. 

FOAMed Quality Standards We Are Aspiring To (Thank You ALIEM Team!):
Metriq Research Agenda
Metriq 8 
Quality Checklist for Healthcare Blogs and Podcasts for Producers, Curators and Consumers

Cook County CUS Team
Jen Rogers, M.D.
Christine Jung, M.D.
Dave Murray, M.D.

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Consider the Probe 3: So I've found the effusion, now what?

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49 y/o M with hx of HTN, HLD, IDDM presents with non-traumatic L-sided painless visual loss.  The patient states that several hours prior to presentation he developed blurry vision in his L eye.  On quick examination, there are no signs of trauma.  Visual acuity is 20/120 on the L and 20/40 on the R with normal intraocular pressures bilaterally.  Pupils are briskly reactive without any photophobia or consensual photophobia.  The lids, sclera, conjunctivae are grossly normal and there are no corneal defects with fluorescein staining.  Coming out of the room, you are concerned about this sudden-onset blurry vision.  You remember a short lecture on visual acuity changes that Dr. Schindlebeck begrudgingly gave you in between his posting about sweater vests on Pinterest.  Your differential brings concerning diagnoses including central retinal arterial occlusion (CRAO), central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), retinal detachment, as well as vitreous hemorrhage.  Now, our patien